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This article, written by Forbes in 2015, is still very relevant today, if not, even more so!

A few important excerpts to consider:

“Won’t all students benefit from a high-level, four-year academic degree program? As it turns out, not really. For one thing, people have a huge and diverse range of different skills and learning styles. Not everyone is good at math, biology, history and other traditional subjects that characterize college-level work. Not everyone is fascinated by Greek mythology, or enamored with Victorian literature, or enraptured by classical music. Some students are mechanical; others are artistic. Some focus best in a lecture hall or classroom; still others learn best by doing, and would thrive in the studio, workshop or shop floor.”

“And not everyone goes to college. The latest figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) show that about 68% of high school students attend college. That means over 30% graduate with neither academic nor job skills.

But even the 68% aren’t doing so well. Almost 40% of students who begin four-year college programs don’t complete them, which translates into a whole lot of wasted time, wasted money, and burdensome student loan debt. Of those who do finish college, one-third or more will end up in jobs they could have had without a four-year degree. The BLS found that 37% of currently employed college grads are doing work for which only a high school degree is required.”

“…despite the growing evidence that four-year college programs serve fewer and fewer of our students, states continue to cut vocational programs.”

“The U.S. economy has changed. The manufacturing sector is growing and modernizing, creating a wealth of challenging, well-paying, highly skilled jobs for those with the skills to do them. The demise of vocational education at the high school level has bred a skills shortage in manufacturing today, and with it a wealth of career opportunities for both under-employed college grads and high school students looking for direct pathways to interesting, lucrative careers.”

Read the full article online here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/nicholaswyman/2015/09/01/why-we-desperately-need-to-bring-back-vocational-training-in-schools/?fbclid=IwAR05E4A8oGBJBaXg0kdSvrT9T4238nFPjHAE39yfD2ttuVD7J_ejuvDCowo#6842a3ec87ad

Certainly the maritime industry has seen similar effects.

MITAGS offers both entry level maritime training and career advancement programs. To learn more about how we can help you enter a rewarding career within the maritime industry, contact our Student Instructional Services Manager, Jenny Pitzen at 206.739.0720 or jpitzen@mitags.org.